7000 Herber Rd
New Tripoli, PA 18066
Office: 610-298-2641
Shop/24 hrs: 610-298-2607
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Lowhill Township News

NARRIS ROAD TO BE CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. YOU CAN ACCESS FROM THE BRIDGE. CLOSED TO ROUTE 100.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION. SPECIAL MEETING ON WEDNESDAY JANUARY 24 AT 6:30 PM TO DISCUSS ACTION. UPDATE: NARRIS ROAD REPAIRS HAVE GONE OUT TO BID.

Starting in December 2023 through April 2024, PennDot will contract with Tri-State Traffic Data, Inc, to collect traffic data on municipality owned roads within Lehigh County. The data collected will be utilized by the Department to complete a statewide network screening and prioritize locations for potential safety improvements. The traffic counters will be set in our municipality between December 2023 and April 2024 and are NOT being set for any road project or speed trap. Should you have any questions, please call Ben Brubaker at 717-443-1805.

If you would like to view the Northern Lehigh Multi Municipal Comprehensive Plan, you can do so by viewing the website https://plannl.org/


Important Notice Regarding Open Burning In The Township

Spring is brush fire season in our region. Area fields are full of dry crop residue, wooded areas are covered in dry leaves and yards haven't turned green yet. The mixture of low humidity, high winds and plenty of available items on the ground to burn can make for a very dangerous situation. The Township monitors weather conditions daily and may place a temporary restriction on burning until conditions improve. Please be aware that while Spring is historically the most common time of year for burn bans, they can be enacted at any time as a result of drought or other weather related events.

Burn bans are enacted every time a Fire Danger Weather Related Warning is issued for our area by the National Weather Service. These notices include the following:

-Fire Weather Watch
-Enhanced Threats for Fire Spread
-Red Flag Warnings

Burn bans apply to all open fires! For more information regarding regulations for burning including acceptable items to burn, hours of burning, setbacks, etc. please review the Township's Burn Ordinance. Ways that you can find out if a burn ban is in effect:

-Contact the Lehigh County 911 Center, Non-emergency # 610-437-5252

(Note: Per Twp. Ord. All open burns must be reported to the County 911 Center via this #)

-Contact the Township office at 610-298-2641 during normal business hours

-Sign-up for weather alerts from the National Weather Service. If an alert is issued related to fire weather in our Township then open burning is prohibited during the times specified in the alert.

Lowhill Township is in need of one auditor (must be available January through March during business hours), And a Road crew Employee. E mail jseymour@lowhilltwp.org for more information.

The Lowhill Township Board of Supervisors will hold their monthly meetings on the 2nd Thursday of the month at 6:30 pm. All meetings will be held at the Municipal Building, unless otherwise advertised.

For important information on Spotted Lantern Fly & Ticks, please click HERE.

Upcoming Meetings / Events


Welcome To Lowhill Township

Lowhill Township is located in Lehigh County, PA with a population of 2,173 at the 2010 census. We are a suburb of Allentown, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the PA. It is drained by the Jordan Creek into the Lehigh River. Its villages include Claussville, Leather Corner Post, New Tripoli, Lyon Valley, and Weidasville. Route 100 crosses it from north to south.

Lowhill Township was established on the 18th day of December, 1753 in the Quarter Sessions Court of Northampton County. Lowhill Township was originally part of the territory that William Penn's sons purchased from the Lenni-Lenape tribe during the infamous Walking Purchase of 1737. Although Lowhill was initially designated part of Northampton County, the township was transferred over when Lehigh County was created in 1812.

A picturesque farming community replete with rolling hills and mineral-rich soil, the land was primarily settled by German immigrants who came to the area during the early part of the 18th Century. As a result, the German dialect known as Pennsylvania Dutch was the primary language of the area for nearly two hundred years, and was often taught in the one-room schoolhouses that operated in the area until the mid-1950s [read more].

Lowhill Township